Informal regulation of pollution in a developing country
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Informal regulation of pollution in a developing country empirical evidence from India by Vinish Kathuria

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Published by South Asian Network for Development and Environmental Economics in Kathmandu .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementVinish Kathuria
SeriesSANDEE working paper -- no. 6-04
ContributionsSouth Asian Network for Development and Environmental Economics
The Physical Object
Paginationvii, 31 p. ;
Number of Pages31
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL24386758M
ISBN 109993382655
LC Control Number2010327994
OCLC/WorldCa664261273

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Informal Regulation of Pollution in a Developing Country: Empirical Evidence from India Vinish Kathuria 1. Introduction The design of policy instruments for industrial pollution is not only complex but also very daunting in the case of developing countries. In principle, the regulator has an array of physical, legal, monetary, andCited by: 9. Informal regulation of pollution in a developing country: empirical evidence from Gujarat, India could be generalised to draw policy implications for other developing countries. It also suggests that future research could look at daily rather than monthly pollution data, in order to test for more immediate effects of press coverage; and. Recent literature has not only recognized the implementation limitations of formal regulation, but also appreciated the significance of informal regulation for achieving environmental goals for developing countries. Since most units in developing world fall under unorganized sector, even utility of some of the informal channels like public-disclosures is by: 3. Informal Regulation of pollution in a Developing Country – Empirical Evidence from Gujarat, India 1. Introduction The design of policy instruments for industrial pollution is not only complex but also very daunting especially in the case of developing countries. In principle, the regulator .

Recent policy discussions recognise the limitations of formal regulations to stem pollution in developing countries. As a result, there is a growing interest in the potential of informal regulations to achieve environmental goals. This article presents a summary version of our model of informal regulation as developed in Pargal and Wheeler (). The model follows convention in defining emissions as the use of "environmental services"—an additional factor of production in an augmented KLEM (capital, labor, energy, materials) frame- Size: 1MB. hypothesis is correct, we would expect widespread informal regulation in developing countries where formal regulation of pollution is absent or ineffective. However, informal regulation may also be common in industrial countries which have nationally-1 For Cited by: Informal regulation of pollution in a developing country: Evidence from India.

Recent policy discussions recognise the limitations of formal regulations to stem pollution in developing countries. As a result, there is a growing interest in the potential of informal regulations to achieve environmental goals. In India, many polluting industries fall under the rubric of . Kathuria, Vinish, "Informal regulation of pollution in a developing country: Evidence from India," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(), pages , , Shameek & Cohen, Mark A., "Information As Regulation: The Effect of Community Right to Know Laws on Toxic Emissions," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages . The price of pollution is determined by the intersection of plant-level demand and a local environmental supply function, enforced by community pressure or informal regulation. Environmental supply is affected by community income, education, the size of the exposed population, the local economic importance of the plant, and its visibility as a polluter.   Pollution is one of the many environmental challenges facing the world today. The impact of pollution is more severe in developing countries, leading to ill health, death and disabilities of millions of people annually. Developed countries have the resources and technologies to combat pollution. As a result of the health risks and the potential impact of climate change, there have been .